Workshops

Workshop at EUROPARC Conference 2016, Parc Jura Vaudois, Switzerland

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Thursday 7th September

Secondary School of Arouca – 14:00 – 18:00

One of the key elements of a EUROPARC Conference is the extensive workshop programme. These 4 hour facilitated sessions deepens into relevant topics to protected area management and ensure delegates can gain from experiences across Europe, as well as debate and consider current challenges and future actions.

These longer sessions will give everyone a chance to participate, to conclude on some important issues and to look forward to new solutions to take back into your own parks.

Please select your workshop choice when you register for the Conference. It may be difficult to change choices when you arrive!

Register here for EUROPARC Conference 2017!

01 – GOOD FIRE, BAD FIRE

Fire is part of Nature as well as from Mankind. Fire has been used by men ever since as a tool to manage the landscape, grazing and farming and often in a sustainable way and have determined specific habitats that now are valued as natural assets. Yet nowadays with climate change, land abandonment and depopulation of rural areas Wild Fires impact asks for prevention, management models and participatory schemes where fire is part of the solution and not only the problem.

02 – CAN WE LIVE WITH THEM?

Wild Fauna is a natural asset but can also be a problem when there are damages on crops, herds or simple car accidents. The dilemma is there and loss compensation is expected from the ones that had the damage, but budget limitations, damage control and lack of predators are part of the problem/solution. What is the limit for payments? Other than just payment? All fauna damages? There are different models to deal with this problem, depending on the fauna, the damage and the society tradition. What are the alternative models?

03 – DO PRIVATES DO IT BETTER?

Private owned nature conservation areas are not common in Europe but exist for a long time. Private sector has showed an increasing interest in nature conservation with sustainable management with low impact activities, in particular ecotourism. There are examples with success from Europe and abroad that should be brought to discussion in a time where land abandonment and depopulation of rural areas is a reality in many places of Europe and wilderness is making its own way as an option.

04 – A NEW ALTERNATIVE SOLUTION FOR PA MANAGEMENT? PRIVATE MANAGEMENT OF PUBLIC PROTECTED AREAS

Public PA have been using outsourcing solutions since quite a while, searching for alternative solutions that cost less. The paradigm of free public services for all is coming to an end in all kind of public services including public use of PA. Increasing outsourcing of services and increasing costs to visit PA are at the centre of a discussion where Public and Private Partnerships tend to be seen as the solution for every problem or demonized as a problem on itself. The discussion needs to present examples from Europe and abroad in order to know alternative models to support public services in this PPP.

05 – NATURAL HEALTH: PROTECTED AREAS AND THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING AGENDA

This workshop will elaborate on the connections between health, well-being and nature. Specifically, it will turn attention to forming effective partnerships with the health sector. Further it will identify through shared examples from across Europe practical tools and programme that parks can deploy not just to serve the health needs of society, but to highlight again, the continuing need for healthy parks for healthy people.

06 – THE LAWS OF NATURE. MANAGING N2000 SITES

Looking the birds and habitats directives and how protected areas, agencies and administration all have a vital role to play in ensuring adequate implementation. We look at some examples of n2000 site management from across Europe

07 – BE A FARMERS FRIEND. SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE IN PROTECTED AREAS

Working in partnership with the farming industry is important if nature and biodiversity is to thrive outside of nature reserves.  IS sustainable agriculture a reality or a pipe dream. How can we marry the needs of the protected areas and that of food production?  We examine what makes a successful partnership that benefit wildlife and farming, and how these could be replicated across Europe.

08 – GOOD FOR BUSINESS; GOOD FOR BIODIVERSITY AND GOOD FOR THE PLANET: CLIMATE CHANGE AND TOURISM INDUSTRY – REDUCING CARBON FOOTPRINT, RESOURCES USE AND POLLUTION

The charter for sustainable tourism in protected areas has enabled small tourism enterprises to be recognised for the efforts made to reduce their impact and resource. We take you on a tour of the charter partners. Learning what practical changes they have made to make their businesses more sustainable and economical…and importantly. why they choose to!

09 – PUBLIC – PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP. INVESTING IN A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FINANCING MECHANISMS FOR A SUCCESSFUL AND SUSTAINABLE LOW CARBON TOURISM DEVELOPMENT

Sustainable tourism is not just about sustaining the landscape, the wildlife and the people and culture of an area, it about being economically sustainable too. That means not just identifying like-minded partners but making good financial choices and funding for the future. We look at how some public and private funding partnership have come about and what were the motivations behind them.

10 – CHANGING CLIMATE CHANGING PARKS; ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF PROTECTED AREAS

Given the evidence of the effects of climate change, it is necessary to develop criteria to guide actions for climate change adaption. This will require strengthening mechanisms for collaboration between scientists and managers of protected areas.

Adaptation to climate change in protected areas should be based on an ecosystem approach, aiming for the protection of the natural resources and ecosystem services provided to society.

Facing this complex challenge requires the establishment of alliances at administration level with the different sectors of society. The workshop will include the presentation of good practice, both in the development of planning tools and in the design of conservation projects.

11 – TRANSBOUNDARY COOPERATION – A MODEL TO CONNECT WILDLIFE AND UNITE PEOPLE

The political times we live in have raised questions about how open or closed our borders should be… BUT nature knows no boundaries, and the people who manage nature have been able to find ways to cooperate and work together. Despite political and national interests and complex histories, those in EUROPARC’s transboundary programme have been able to establish positive working relationship that go far beyond the wildlife and landscape they manage.
We examine good practise across the TransPArc Network and elaborate how what they have learned can be translated into work across Europe.

12 – MAKING AN IMPACT- MEASURING THE IMPACT OF PEOPLE IN PERIURBAN PARKS

The natural spaces around our major urban places are vital green lungs for city dwellers as well as important features of the landscape.  The pressures these greenspaces are under can be immense with multi use visitation   and different land uses all competing with the need to maintain viable and resilient habitats. This workshop, learning from the experience of Fedenatur members, will examine different methodologies to measure the impact of visitors and explore ideas such as carrying capacity and limits of acceptable change.

13 – MANAGING ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE – CONNECTING LAND AND SEA

Protected areas at the interface between the marine and terrestrial have a unique and interesting perspective
People care strongly about our coasts. Access to them is important to our health and well-being and relationships to the marine environment make a fundamental contribution to the economy and culture of our coastal communities.
Our coasts and coastal waters are under considerable pressure, from both human activities – such as conventional and renewable energy, port development, recreation and tourism – and not least from climate change impacts, particularly sea-level rise leading to increased coastal flooding and erosion.
Regimes and legislation for management of land and the marine environment are often separate and not well coordinated – we are still not good at integrated coastal management.
The workshop will explore land-sea relationships and work being done to integrate management across the land-sea boundary.

14 – OLD PARKS: NEW MONEY? ALTERNATIVE FUNDING STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTED AREAS

Traditionally, national and regional protected areas have been fully funded from administrations. However, in recent years alternative funding strategies for protected areas to supplement or replace traditional fundings have emerged.  This workshop will examine, what makes them successful?
Different funding strategies of parks to enhance their financial support from the private sector in order to protect nature will be considered such as the labelling of products, collecting donations, to the very sophisticated distribution of ecosystem services will be examined. As well as identifying what is and how we measure success, the workshop will look at negative/ positive experience with companies funding nature projects and What can the community of all parks in EUROPARC do to enhance funding from the private sector?

15 – MODERN PARK RANGERS – IMPROVING SKILLS FOR EFFECTIVE RANGER TEAMS

All over the world Rangers stand in the frontline of nature conservation – on the Thin Green Line! They are the faces and ambassadors for their parks in the public. The variety of tasks and duties of Rangers is very wide, from patrolling and law enforcement to environmental education, monitoring of wildlife and resource management. As multiple as the duties of Rangers in Europe are also the Ranger Training Standards of the different European countries vary. We will examine some different Ranger training systems and approaches in Europe and highlight the skills and standards needed for a modern Park Ranger.

16 – SPORTS IN NATURE. IS IT FIT FOR PURPOSE?

There is an increasing number of events and participants in outdoor leisure and sport activities that take part inside protected areas. This is both a business opportunity and a moment to highlight the protected area’s role in nature conservation. Problems arise at multiple levels from destructive impacts on fauna and flora as well as accidents and safety/rescue issues. Can we manage these elements and still create sporting events in protected areas? Is Sport IN Nature fit for purpose? We will discuss and learn what has been done to organise such events.