Workshops presentations

Workshop at EUROPARC Conference 2017 Arouca, Magic Mountains, Portugal © Eduardo Realinho

One of the key elements of a EUROPARC Conference is the extensive workshop programme. These 4 hour facilitated sessions deepens into relevant topics to protected area management and ensure delegates can gain from experiences across Europe, as well as debate and consider current challenges and future actions.

01 – GOOD FIRE, BAD FIRE

Fire is a natural process and thus there is not a good or bad fire. However, the frequency of wildfires seems to be increasing all over Europe,  due to the high temperatures registered in the last decade. Invasive species, intensive areas of monocultures and instability at national level in forestry policies were highlighted as some of the main challenges. However, fire might also be a management tool, and this was one of the main topics discussed during the workshop. How can fire prescription reduce the damages of wildfires in the Mediterranean region?

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Moderated by Paulo Mateus, ICNF (PT), Workshop Introduction

Case Study 1: Is there a bad/good fire? By Paulo Fernandes, CITAB (PT)

Case Study 2: Prescription of Fire in nature conservation areas – Practical cases from Italy and Portugal. By Carlos Loureiro, GIFF (PT)

02 – CAN WE LIVE WITH THEM?

Wild Fauna is a natural asset but can also be a problem when there are damages on crops, herds or simple car accidents. The dilemma is there and loss compensation is expected from the ones that had the damage, but budget limitations, damage control and lack of predators are part of the problem/solution. What is the limit for payments? Other than just payment? All fauna damages? There are different models to deal with this problem, depending on the fauna, the damage and the society tradition. What are the alternative models?

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Moderated by Margarida Fernandes, ICNF (PT), Workshop Introduction

Case Study 1: Living with wild boar and wolf in the Apennine Mountains. By Carlo Bifulco, Monti Sibillini National Park (IT)

Case Study 2: Conflicts and opportunities with wolves – Lessons from Peneda-Geres National Park. By Francisco Álvares, CIBIO (PT)

03 – DO PRIVATES DO IT BETTER?

Private owned nature conservation areas are not common in Europe but exist for a long time. Private sector has showed an increasing interest in nature conservation with sustainable management with low impact activities, in particular ecotourism. There are examples with success from Europe and abroad that should be brought to discussion in a time where land abandonment and depopulation of rural areas is a reality in many places of Europe and wilderness is making its own way as an option.

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Moderated by Paulo Castro, Ponto Natura (PT)

Case Study 1: The case of the only private Nature Reserve in Portugal, Faia Brava Reserve. By Pedro Prata, ATN (PT)

Case Study 2: Private Natural Heritage Reserves in Brazil. By Flávio Ojidos, CNRPPN (BR)

04 – A NEW ALTERNATIVE SOLUTION FOR PA MANAGEMENT? PRIVATE MANAGEMENT OF PUBLIC PROTECTED AREAS

Public Protected Areas have been using outsourcing solutions since quite a while, searching for alternative solutions that cost less. The paradigm of free public services for all is coming to an end in all kind of public services including public use of PA. Increasing outsourcing of services and increasing costs to visit PA are at the centre of a discussion where Public and Private Partnerships tend to be seen as the solution for every problem or demonized as a problem on itself. The discussion needs to present examples from Europe and abroad in order to know alternative models to support public services in this PPP.

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Moderated by Kaja Lotman, Estonian Environmental Board (EE)

Case Study 1: The Role of Friends in Finnish Park management – actions and plans. By Pia Soderlund, Chair of the Friends of Bothnian Sea National Park (FI)

Case Study 2: Searching for new management models for Brazilian Parks, By Fernando Pieroni, SEMEIA (BR)

05 – NATURAL HEALTH: PROTECTED AREAS AND THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING AGENDA

What is the Agenda of Health in Protected Areas? What has the EUROPARC Health Commission been working on? What are the good examples across Europe?

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Moderated by Pete Rawcliffe, Scottish Natural Heritage (UK) Workshop Introduction

Case Study 1: Making more of the good practice from across Europe – key lessons from emerging practice. By Carles Castell, Diputación de Barcelona (ES)

Case Study 2: Partnerships with the Health Sector, By Joel Erkkonen, Parks & Wildlife Finland (FI)

Case Study 3: A toolkit on Health and Protected Areas, By Nele Sober, Estonian Environmental Board (EE)

06 – THE LAWS OF NATURE. MANAGING N2000 SITES

Looking the birds and habitats directives and how protected areas, agencies and administration all have a vital role to play in ensuring adequate implementation. We look at some examples of n2000 site management from across Europe and the latest EU Action Plan for Nature, People and the Economy in Europe.

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Moderated by Michael Hosek, Coordinator of EUROPARC Central and Eastern Europe (CZ)

Special Participation: The EU Action Plan for Nature, People and the Economy, Micheal O’Briain, European Commission – DG Environment (BE)

Case Study 1: An overview of EUROPARC Spain Perspective. By Marta Múgica, Coordinator of EUROPARC Spain (ES)

Case Study 2: „The added value of ‚Large Protected Areas‘ in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern for the implementation of the EU Action Plan”. By Olaf Ostermann, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Ministerium for Environment and Agriculture (DE)

07 – BE A FARMERS FRIEND. SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE IN PROTECTED AREAS

Working in partnership with the farming industry is important if nature and biodiversity is to thrive outside of nature reserves.  How can we marry the needs of the protected areas and that of food production?  We examined what makes a successful partnership that benefits wildlife and farming, and how these could be replicated across Europe.

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Moderated by Corrado Teofili, Federparchi-EUROPARC Italy (IT) Workshop Introduction

Special Participation: The EU Action Plan for Nature, People and the Economy, Micheal O’Briain, European Commission – DG Environment (BE)

Case Study 1: Agriculture, Parks and Biodiversity – Castro Verde Case Study. By Rita Alcazar, LPN (PT)

Case Study 2: Urban Agriculture: taking care of vegetables and citizens. By Maria Pia Sparla (presented by Corrado Teofili), Parco Agricolo Sud Milano (IT)

Case Study 3: The Wicklow Uplands Council. By Tom Byrne, Wicklow Uplands Council (IE)

08 – GOOD FOR BUSINESS; GOOD FOR BIODIVERSITY AND GOOD FOR THE PLANET: CLIMATE CHANGE AND TOURISM INDUSTRY – REDUCING CARBON FOOTPRINT, RESOURCES USE AND POLLUTION

Sustainable tourism is not just about sustaining the landscape, the wildlife and the people and culture of an area, it about being economically sustainable too. The European Charter for Sustainable Tourism in Protected areas is a good tool to enhance sustainable tourism and it has a higher influence in business performance through the Charter Parts II and III.  A survey developed by EUROPARC-Spain about the impact of the Charter Part II shows that: Businesses think that the Charter helped them to enhance closer relations with the Protected Area and other committed businesses; The Charter Partner Businesses have implemented a huge amount of environmental management actions with relevant impact in energy saving, water saving, conservation, etc. When measured, the impact can be shown; the efforts to become sustainable tourism businesses can increase considerably the initial costs of tourism businesses but finally, these efforts generate high costs saving and higher quality of their services.

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Moderated by Amanda Guzmán, Ecotourism Club (ES) Workshop Introduction

Case Study 1: The Nature Regional Park of Livradois-Forez Network. By Caroline Le Roy, Nature Regional Park Livradois-Forez (FR)

Case Study 2: Spain’s Secret Sierra. By Angel Salvador, Posada Alajar (ES)

Case Study 3: Ecotourism Club in Spain. By Amanda Guzmán (ES)

10 – CHANGING CLIMATE CHANGING PARKS; ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF PROTECTED AREAS

There is evidence of climate change but still few project on adaptation. More emphasis on mitigation. Most conservation projects contribute to adaption. Example: wetlands restoration, forest management, dunes restoration. It is necessary to develop criteria to guide actions for climate change adaption. This will require strengthening mechanisms for collaboration between scientists and managers of protected areas. Adaptation to climate change in protected areas should be based on an ecosystem approach, aiming for the protection of the natural resources and ecosystem services provided to society.

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Moderated by José Antonio Atauri, EUROPARC Spain (ES)

Case Study 1: Incorporating Climate Change Adaption into planning and management. By José Antonio Atauri, EUROPARC Spain (ES)

Case Study 2: Experiences of Adaption to Climate change in Catalonia Nature Protected Areas. By Leonardo Bejarano, Generalitat de Catalunya (ES)

Extra: Manual for Climate Change Adaption into Protected Areas Management Plans (in Spanish, with English Summary)

11 – TRANSBOUNDARY COOPERATION – A MODEL TO CONNECT WILDLIFE AND UNITE PEOPLE

The political times we live in have raised questions about how open or closed our borders should be… BUT nature knows no boundaries, and the people who manage nature have been able to find ways to cooperate and work together. Despite political and national interests and complex histories, those in EUROPARC’s transboundary programme have been able to establish positive working relationship that go far beyond the wildlife and landscape they manage.

Moderated by Jakub Kaspar, EUROPARC Central and Eastern Europe (CZ)

Case Study 1: Beyond the Borders: cooperation between Germany and Czech Republic. By Martin Starý, Šumava National Park (CZ)

Case Study 2: Oulanka -Paanajärvi National parks – cross-border cooperation between Finland and Russia. By Pirkko Siikamäki, Parks & Wildlife Finland, Metsähallitus (FI)

12 – MAKING AN IMPACT- MEASURING THE IMPACT OF PEOPLE IN PERIURBAN PARKS

The natural spaces around our major urban places are vital green lungs for city dwellers as well as important features of the landscape.  The pressures these green spaces are under can be immense with multi-use visitation and different land uses all competing with the need to maintain viable and resilient habitats. Park managers need to have references on carrying capacities assessments from other parks, to estimate their own and to show decision-makers what happens in other areas. And most important, park managers need to share successful measures to revert impact of visitors/tourists in parks.

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Moderated by Teresa Pastor, EUROPARC Federation – Barcelona Office (ES)

Case Study 1: Carrying Capacity Assessment: an overview. By Diego García-Ventura, EUROPARC Spain and Fernando González Bérnaldez Foundation (ES)

Case Study 2: Tracking and Managing Recreational use and environmental impacts . By Estela Inés Farías, Univeristy of Lleida (ES)

Case Study 3: Monitoring attendance to preserve and manage Urban Parks. By Nuno Lavrador, UpNorth Group (PT)

Case Study 4: Assessing Trail Degradation in Collserola Nature Park. By Seán Cahill, Collserola Nature Park (ES)

Case Study 5: Assessing informal trails network and its impacts in periurban areas: a case study from Arrábida Nature Park (PT). By Luís Monteiro, Faculty of Environmental Sciences (CZ)

Case Study 6: Visitors in a natural space: Yes, but not that much! By Fernando Louro Alves, Parque Florestal de Monsanto (PT)

Case Study 7: Monitoring Tourism Impact in Medvenica Nature Park, By Snježana Malić-Limari, Medvenica Nature Park (HR) and Andrea Stefan, WWF Adria (HR)

13 – MANAGING ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE – CONNECTING LAND AND SEA

People care strongly about our coasts. Access to them is important to our health and well-being and relationships to the marine environment make a fundamental contribution to the economy and culture of our coastal communities. Our coasts and coastal waters are under considerable pressure, from both human activities – such as conventional and renewable energy, port development, recreation and tourism – and not least from climate change impacts, particularly sea-level rise leading to increased coastal flooding and erosion.

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Moderated by Tim Venes, EUROPARC Atlantic Isles (UK) Workshop introduction

Case Study 1: From Ecological meltdown to community-led marine protection. By Howard Wood, COAST, the Community of Arran Seabed Trust (UK)

Case Study 2: Active management for a changing coastline; experience from a coastal realignment project. By Tim Callaway, RSPB (UK)

14 – OLD PARKS: NEW MONEY? ALTERNATIVE FUNDING STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTED AREAS

Traditionally, national and regional protected areas have been fully funded from administrations. However, in recent years alternative funding strategies for protected areas to supplement or replace traditional fundings have emerged.  What makes them successful?

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Moderated by Katja Artz, EUROPARC Germany (DE) Workshop introduction

Case Study 1: Bring partners together: experience with water, health and recreational sectors in the NL. By Irene Bouwma, Wageningen University & Research (NL)

Case Study 2: Case Studies from the German National Parks. By Katja Artz, EUROPARC Germany (DE)

15 – MODERN PARK RANGERS – IMPROVING SKILLS FOR EFFECTIVE RANGER TEAMS

All over the world Rangers stand in the frontline of nature conservation – on the Thin Green Line! They are the faces and ambassadors for their parks in the public. The variety of tasks and duties of Rangers is very wide, from patrolling and law enforcement to environmental education, monitoring of wildlife and resource management. As multiple as the duties of Rangers in Europe are also the Ranger Training Standards of the different European countries vary. Rangers need to keep up with new technology, new environmental pressures and challenges. This requires training and openness for continuous personal development by rangers and managers also.

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Moderated by Frank Gruetz, European Ranger Federation (DE) Workshop introduction

Case Study 1: The Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Journey. By Ruth Grant, Scottish Countryside Rangers Association (UK)

Case Study 2: Ranger Training in Germany. By Frank Gruetz, European Ranger Federation (DE)

16 – SPORTS IN NATURE. IS IT FIT FOR PURPOSE?

There is an increasing number of events and participants in outdoor leisure and sport activities that take part inside protected areas. This is both a business opportunity and a moment to highlight the protected area’s role in nature conservation. Problems arise at multiple levels from destructive impacts on fauna and flora as well as accidents and safety/rescue issues. Can we manage these elements and still create sporting events in protected areas? Is Sport IN Nature fit for purpose?

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Moderated by Olaf Holm, Montagne de Reims Nature Regional Park (FR)

Case Study 1: Connecting Protected Areas and Outdoor Sports, the French experience. François Beauchard, ENOS (FR)

Case Study 2: Guide for good practices to hold Mountain Races in Protected Areas. By Carlota Martínez, EUROPARC Spain (ES)

Case Study 3: The European Network of Outdoor Activities (ENOS), by François Beauchard, ENOS (FR)

extra: Guide to hold Mountain Races in  Protected Areas